Fill the Frame – Composition

In my recent post about Photo Composition one of the things I talked about was how important it is not to crop your subjects limbs out of a photo unnecessarily. Well, today I’m going to talk about something that will be slightly contradictory to that, but just know there’s a time and a place for both! I can’t say it enough – this is YOUR photography journey, so embrace what YOU like, and screw what anyone else says 😉 The topic of this blog post is filling the frame. It is literally where you fill the frame with your subject.

This is one of the photos I used in the Photo Composition blog, just know that it applies here, too!


Photo Composition by Ashley Kanton Photography

 

 

This photo is a great example of filling the frame, because there is NO question what you are focusing on here. You can see SO much personality from being this up close and personal. Truly, I wasn’t close to him at all though, I was just using my macro lens, but you get the gist of what I mean. A photo in the same spot of his bedroom, with me placed further back from him, would have shown you so many distracting things behind him on the floor and the toy box, and you would have been looking everywhere except directly at his eyes. You also would not have been able to see SO much detail of his eyes, which I absolutely LOVE.

Photo Composition by Ashley Kanton Photography

 

 

Everything I stated about the above photo applies to this one, too. I was focused on his cute little button nose, and had I not filled the frame, you may have looked anywhere first than where I was intending for you to.

Photo Composition by Ashley Kanton Photography

 

Filling the frame allows for your photograph to have a bigger impact than if you left space around your subject. None of these photos would be as powerful as they are without the distractions around them. They’d still be just as cute, because what is our subject if not cute?! But they wouldn’t be making the same statement.

 

Fill the Frame – Composition
  1. […] in the middle of the photograph. Instead, try using the Rule of Thirds, Framing, Negative Space, Filling the Frame, or Leading […]

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